Radon, How it Causes Lung Cancer. The Facts.

Radon. No One Likes Bad Gas

We've heard about radon, and what it does. Let's look at why you need to be aware of it.

Nuclear power plant?  Most likely, you won't have that in your home, but levels of radon higher than 4.0 pCi/L carries a risk.

Nuclear power plant?  Most likely, you won't have that in your home, but levels of radon higher than 4.0 pCi/L carries a risk.

How Does it Hurt?

Uranium, plutonium, nuclear reactors. Radon has something in common with all of these. They're all radioactive in varying levels. 

It is proven that being exposed to radiation will increase your chances of cancer. 

In the same way, radon gas decays very quickly and gives off radioactive particles. Long term exposure of these particles can lead to lung cancer. According to the National Cancer Institute, Lung cancer is the only cancer with which there is evidence that radon causes it.

 

How is the General Population Exposed?

RADON IS ALMOST EVERYWHERE. 

Its estimated that 1 in 15 homes have radon levels above the EPA recommended 4.0 pCi/L (picocuries per liter) of air.

But don't worry - it's usually at very low levels. It's at high levels where it increases your chances of lung cancer. 

How It Gets In.

Radon can enter homes through cracks in floors, walls, or foundations, and collect indoors. It can also be released from building materials, or from water obtained from wells that contain radon. Radon levels can be higher in homes that are well insulated, tightly sealed, and/or built on soil rich in the elements uranium, thorium, and radium. Basement and first floors typically have the highest radon levels because of their closeness to the ground.
— The National Cancer Institute
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How was it Discovered as Dangerous?

It was first discovered as unhealthy when scientists noted that underground uranium miners had higher rates of lung cancer. They then did a study using rodents (poor little guys), and they also showed a high rate of tumors when exposed to high levels of radon. 

Do smokers have a higher chance? 

Ohhhh yes. The NCI (National Cancer Institute) studies have shown that it's only a little over 10% of radon related cancer are non-smokers. So if you smoke, and are exposed to high levels of radon, that's NINE times more likely that your going to get lung cancer. 

So if you are a smoker, it is imperative that you get your home tested.

In conclusion:

Radon = Radioactive. Don't breathe it in at high levels. 

If your a smoker, definitely, get a radon test for your home. 

Also, here's a shout-out to the rodents who had to get exposed to radon for our safety.

 

TEST.

FIX.

SAVE A LIFE. 

JOIN ACE INSPECTIONS AND THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY IN SAVING YOUR FAMILY'S LIFE. 

Test for Radon. No one likes having bad gas.

 

Souce: http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/radon

 

 

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